Thursday, May 2, 2019


MAY 2019
   SHOES
I recently re-read a favorite picture book of mine called, “My Shoes Take Me Where I Want To Go,” by Marianne Richmond.   As she names the various shoes in her young family’s closet our imaginations take us to the various venues where these shoes could be worn, favorite sports, the wild west, the beach, Hollywood, mountain tops, etc.  
That motivated me to look in my own closet.  I’m not much of a shoe guru.  I wear my shoes and boots until they fall apart and I don’t have too many choices. Take my rubber boots for example.  I have had them for at least 10 years.  My daughter took them to Costa Rica when she was in college.  She worked in the rainforest and needed to protect her feet from unacceptable critters.  Recently they have lived at the horse barn where I boarded my horse.  I wear them in the spring, mostly, when the mud in the paddock is deep and stinky.  They aren’t allowed in the house!  The same rule applies to the winter boots I wear out to the farm.  I do have a new addition to my “horsey”  foot attire, my “horse slippers.”  To be clear, these are for my feet not my horse’s feet.  My children gave them to me for Christmas this year.  They are toasty warm, felted wool, made in and shipped from Estonia!  
My black leather shoes are my school shoes.  They’re comfortable and easy to put on.  My feet need comfortable shoe these days so I wear them often!  I try to polish them from time to time to make them look work-place worthy, but the streak of glue, enhanced with glitter still shows if you look closely.  If I notice you looking at my feet I’ll know what you’re looking for.
The navy blue shoes in my closet looked so scuffed up I didn’t wear them often………until recently.  My sister and I were reminiscing about how nice looking our dad kept all the family shoes.  It was his army skills that kept them shiny.  “Spit and polish” he called his method.  He never taught us the technique  and now our shoes look pitiful.  Plus, I had no navy polish to work with, since the shoe repair store has such short hours and I can’t seem to get there on time.  BUT, “what to my wondering eyes should appear,” in my basement pile of  memorabilia from Dad, but his shoe box with bushes, rags and BLUE SHOE CREME, still soft and useable after many years!  My navy shoes look great now.  I’m proud to wear them!  Thanks, Dad!
Lastly, I love my gray and pink running shoes.  I’ve put many miles on them over the years running down the road at the cabin and in the neighborhood.  They feel so comfy I have taken them  as my primary footwear to Ireland, Scandinavia, the Grand Canyon and Canyonlands National Park.  They’re showing a little wear but how can I part with something that has made so many memories with me?  
Shoes, shoes, shoes, they let us be who we want to be and take us where we want to go.  They protect our feet, take us to work,  help us play and they wear us out.  At the end of the day, when I’m tired  and worn,  they take me home, bringing me to the feet of Jesus where I can feel safe and loved like a child climbing into her mother’s lap at the end of the day.  There is no better place to be.  

Where  will your shoes take you today?


Wednesday, March 20, 2019

UNFINISHED PROJECTS

Like many people, I have some unfinished projects around the house.  I’m a knitter and I have to admit, what I enthusiastically start doesn’t always get finished.  I am conscious of the fact that it’s still in my knitting bag but it is too far down the priority list to get taken out except on long drives to distant destinations.  It’s a dark cloud hanging over my head.  Maybe that’s why an article written by a therapist who took out her unfinished knitting project and discovered it had therapeutic benefits, caught my eye.  How could that be?  The therapist invited others, who also had unfinished projects, to join her as she knit.  That way they could hold each other accountable for finishing the items.  What she discovered was remarkable.  Each person in the group began to share various touching stories from their lives as it related to the project in their hands.  They talked about their children who once would have fit the sweater they were knitting or the special person who taught them the skill but who is no longer with them.  On and on the stories went.  They became something of a support group for each  other over time.  I’m assuming their projects eventually got finished but that became secondary to the friendships that developed.
With that in mind, I took out my mittens that I have been working  on, intermittently, for many years.  In the meantime I have knit many other articles, hats, baby blankets, scarves, Christmas stockings, felted purses and pillow covers.  I just can’t seem to finish the blue and green mittens.  I bought the yarn in Bozeman, Montana when I was on a ski trip.  My friend, Linda, and I both love to knit so over the 17 years we went to Big Sky we always took a day out to shop for yarn (and other things.) Those are sweet memories!  When I’m not working on the mittens I keep my knitting bag in a wooden storage box that my dad made when he was in high school.  He said his mom used to keep old socks that needed darning in that box.  On the wall above it is a cross stitch piece made by a dear friend of our family, Lorraine.  Lorraine was like a second mom to me and her daughter, Bonnie, is still  one of my treasured friends.  Bonnie recently found the cross stitch project, unfinished, among her mother’s boxes of saved  treasures. The directions were stored with it so Bonnie bought matching embroidery thread and finished the hanging, sending it to me for my birthday.  What wonderful memories that brought back for both of us!  

I can feel the magic working for Linda, Bonnie and me as we use our unfinished projects to instigate discussions about our past.  One story leads to another and another.  The unfinished projects that once felt like such a burden helped us look back and appreciate  many of our life experiences.  We can see how God has walked with us all the way.  Next I plan to get out my mom’s unfinished weaving project.  I wonder what stories God has in store for me next?  I can’t wait to see!



Thursday, January 17, 2019

FEBRUARY 2019

What’s For Dinner?

February………the shepherds are back in their fields, the wisemen have gone home, the Christmas decorations are put away.  Now it is time for the Christmas work to begin, sharing faith, hope and love with family, friends and community.   My birthday falls just before Christmas and I received a wonderful book from a friend.  “Table Life, Savoring the Hospitality of Jesus in Your Home,” by Joanne Thompson opened my eyes to the wonderful gift of hospitality as a way of doing Jesus’ work in the world around us.  I love the fact that, as Joanne says, we don’t have to be fabulous cooks or have fancy houses to reach out to others inviting them into our homes to sit at the table with us and Jesus.  Looking at Jesus’ life in the New Testament we see many examples of Jesus taking time to quietly share a meal with others.  Even as a young child, Jesus needed to be fed as all of our children do.  There was always a blessing and a spirit of gratitude to God for providing food.  There was conversation and listening and a feeling of love present at the table.   
One of the first chapters in the book caught my attention.  The chapter was titled, “Thanks for Supper, Mom.”  It addresses our current cultural tendencies to let our busy schedules at work and school become more important than taking time for the family to have dinner together at the end of the day.  When it does happen we often find ourselves checking our phones or watching TV.  We’re all guilty at times.  
Finding time to sit down together for dinner is a gift we need to give our children.  This is a time when they hear our voices thanking God for his gift of food and family.  They learn a attitude of gratitude that they can take with them the rest of the week.  When we look our children in the eyes and focus our attention on them they see our love for them and recognize our faith in Jesus to show us how to live.
    Okay, I have four children and I remember some chaos at the table when they were young.  It’s not always easy to make dinner a time that children look forward to.  Joanne Thompson makes some suggestions.  All of you have young children and this is an opportunity to  establish a family dinner ritual.  That includes involving your children and your spouse in the meal preparation.  Good conversation happens when the table is being set or the carrots are being peeled.  Let them all have some skin in the game.  Be creative by using “special” dishes on occasion or lighting candles.  Mix up the menu.  Try serving a fruit dessert first and then the main dish.  Crazy?  Maybe not once in awhile.  When you talk to your children, avoid general questions like, “What did you do today?”  Be more specific by asking, “Who did you play with today?”  “Did you like the story, “The Three Bears?”   (We post the preschool activities of the day next to the classroom door to help you out with this.)  Making dinner pleasant will make it a time your children will look forward to each day, now and when they are grown up.

Having regular family meals has been shown to have a positive affect on your child’s development cognitively, emotionally, socially, physically and spiritually.  I’m thankful for the positive example my parents set for me and my siblings.  I hope I have done the same for my children and grandchildren.  Blessings on you and your family dinner rituals as your children grow and learn to join you and Jesus at the table.

Monday, December 17, 2018

A  Dr. Seuss Day

After the holidays does your house look like Thing One and Thing Two have paid you a visit?  After all the entertaining do you wish you could hire someone to take down the tree, put the decorations away, remove the  chocolate from the table cloth and suck the glitter out of the carpet?  You’re not alone!  Thank goodness we live in the northern hemisphere!  The holiday season is followed by the month of January and we have many cold, snowy days to pick up the house. 
I admit that I remember running wild with the cousins at the holiday gatherings, hiding in the closets, running around the basement, creating puppet shows for the aunts and uncles.  Sure, lingonberries spilled on the table cloth but we didn’t like them anyway.  Gifts were unwrapped and the paper and ribbons adorned the room.  It was great!  The grownups finally kicked us out of the house.  They told us to go sledding or skating for awhile to get the wiggles out.  That worked for the time being but the pile of snow pants, boots, mittens, hats and jackets that were left on the floor in addition to the melting snow was a bit overwhelming.  Some years the adults bundled us up and took us downtown Minneapolis to see the magical windows in the Dayton’s department store.  I’m dating myself I guess!  It got us out of the house so the meal could be made or cleaned up, whichever the case may be.  Did I mention there were 21 cousins in all?  It was a busy place, but we loved every minute.
Because of these memories, I can’t complain about the mess left after the holidays.  It’s proof that we had a good time.  Thing One and Thing Two did a number on the house, as always, but I found hope in Dr. Seuss’s book, “The Cat in the Hat Comes Back.”  Perhaps you’re read it.  
When “Sally and I”  were left at home to shovel the walk, Cat in the Hat showed up, entered their house and proceeded to eat cake in the bathtub, leaving a red ring in the tub.  He wiped it up with mother’s white dress, then wiped red on the wall, then on Father’s $10 shoes, and on and on it goes!  You get the picture.  Eventually guilt overcomes Cat in the Hat and he brings in friends to help clean up the mess.  One by one he brings out Little Cats A, B, C, D, E, F, ………..all the way up to Little Cats X and Y.  Still there is a mess!  The red is now outside on the snow.  Enter Little Cat Z with something called Voom.

Now, don’t ask me what Voom is.
I never will know.
But, boy!  Let me tell you
It DOES clean up the snow! 

There you have it!  Forget what you heard on social media.  Ignore the adds on TV.  Get Voom by Dr. Suess and all your cleaning problems will be solved.  That’s my advice for 2019.

Happy New Year!

Monday, November 19, 2018

Receiving

December 2018

Even before the jack-o-lanterns were blown out and the Halloween candy was put on sale, the Christmas retail wars began.  Free shipping and deep discounts became available  immediately.  In some stores, Black Friday sales were offered before the end of October.  Yikes!  
Christmas is all about giving!  It’s our opportunity to tell family and friends we love and appreciate them by the giving of a gift.  Plus, admit it, there is a certain amount of pride a person feels in being able to snag a real bargain  during this frenzied shopping season.  I’m sure it’s good for the economy, too, and we need to be supportive of that, right?  Off we go, cutting coupons, searching online to compare prices, waiting in long lines for deep discounts at Walmart or Target or Costco.  Maybe you’re a DYI person who finds yourself knitting, quilting, sewing or baking up a storm at this time of year.  Good for you!
Often times I find myself annoyed by this early emphasis on Christmas shopping.  It makes me feel like I’m already “behind” on my plans and responsibilities.  Just let me eat turkey and count my blessings first.  Then I can begin to think about what the best Christmas gift might be.  
Maybe I need to go back to the original  reason for Christmas to discover the best gift. Christmas is about the birth of Jesus, the Son of God. Maybe I need to look for the best gift ideas in the Bible as opposed to the catalogues.  Jesus’ birth is the first Gift of Christmas.  He is God’s gift to us showing us how much he loves us.  We did nothing to earn this gift.  It is truly an offering from God which he hopes we will humbly accept.  We Minnesotans are not always good at accepting gifts.  We feel self-conscious or undeserving.  We might push it away or give it back, not wanting  to appear needy or greedy.  God’s gift of love is one he wants us to embrace, allowing it to change the way we live.  It will overflow in our hearts, spilling out to others in our  lives.  

Does that mean I should skip shopping?  I love the spirit of giving.  Can I get it done early, like the retail stores are encouraging me to do, leaving December for a focus on Jesus?  I want to visit Bethlehem with the shepherds to see the  baby in the manger, recognizing him as God’s gift of love and accepting that gift in my heart.  To experience the meaning of Christmas is to  learn the importance of graciously receiving God’s love.  This year I want to make Christmas a time of humbly receiving not a time of pride in what I’m giving.  We all know the cliché, “It’s better to give than to receive.”  Maybe we need to turn it around for Christmas.  Embrace that baby Jesus and let him grow in your heart all year!  

Monday, October 22, 2018

Uff Da!

Ever since I was a young girl I looked forward to going to Sweden.  My beloved grandfather, Erick Nordeen,  came from Sweden in the early nineteen hundreds at age 19.   My paternal great grandparents, Alex and Anna Bjorklund, emigrated from Sweden to a farm near Princeton in the 1880s.  Although there was never much talk about it, I always wondered why my ancestors left their country and members of their family to come here.  Grandpa Nordeen knew he would never return to his homeland.  It was an expensive, long and difficult journey.  He had done it once and that was enough.  This was his home now.  He did, however, make a few comments about “home” on occasion.  If we took him to Duluth to enjoy the scenery along the North Shore or drove through rural farmlands he would quietly nod his head and say, “Just like home.  Just like home.”
Now it was my turn to travel across the ocean to Scandinavia.  My family and I visited the mountains and fjords of Norway and the beautiful city of Copenhagen.  Touring Sweden was the most meaningful for me.  Before leaving for our trip I tried to discover why so many Swedish families left home for a land they knew little about.  My grandparents never talked about their struggles.  I read “The Emigrants”  by Wilhelm  Moberg and joined ancestry.com to learn more about my family.  Farms in Sweden had become so small, as they divided them again and again to hand them down to family members, that a family could not survive on them any longer.  The church of Sweden was so controlling  that individuals were ex-communicated  for any differing opinions.  Perhaps these were part of the decision to leave.  America offered a better chance for  happiness and Minnesota felt like home.  It was sad to leave family.  The travel and transition was difficult.  In spite of it all, they were thankful to be here.
Sweden was lovely.  The small farms were well kept, dotted with red barns and red farm houses.  The rolling hills were planted with grains and hay mixtures that we would recognize in our own farm fields.  Rocky outcroppings left by the glaciers thousands of years ago and lakes, surrounded by pines and birch, dotted the countryside.  Stockholm  and the archipelago on it’s eastern edge were picturesque.  It reminded me of Duluth and Lake Superior.  Now, here I was in Sweden, wanting to say, as my grandfather did in Minnesota, “Just like home.  Just like home.”  

This Thanksgiving, as I reflect on the Pilgrims’ emigration to America, I will have a new appreciation for the courage of these people who left the known and came to the unknown and for the depth of thankfulness for their new life here.  After surviving the first year in America, with the help of the Native Americans, they were not rich and they did not live in fancy houses.  They were in a difficult situation but they were thankful.  We’re blessed to have a national day that celebrates the importance of being thankful.  Blessings to you as you celebrate this year!  


Saturday, April 14, 2018


SUMMER OPPORTUNITIES




There is so much to do and so little time!  That’s how we feel at the end of our school year.  At Preschool we always go out with a BANG!  Half of our students will be graduating from our school and be off to their various school districts for kindergarten.  We will miss them but we know they are well prepared for the next step.  We will celebrate that progress plus the accomplishments of our younger students in the month of May.  During our last month of school  we will have many visitors including Paxton Schmidt’s dad, Philip, who will demonstrate throwing pots (He is a potter.  Had you worried didn’t I?) and teach the four year olds how to create their own pots with real potter’s clay.  The New Brighton Police and Fire Fighters will visit all of our classes this month as will Julie Philbrook the Safety Educator from Hennepin County Medical Center.  
  We like to get out a bit in the spring.  Our four year olds will be spending a morning at Silverwood Park  where the staff there will provide a program about birds and print  making.  The three year olds will be taking a school bus for a morning at Como Park Zoo.  The animals are exciting to see but the real thrill is the ride on the bus!  
Knowing that spring is bound to show up soon, our students have been planting seeds and making plans to get out in our Preschool Garden.  Our students plant the garden each spring to grow food for the Ralph Reeder Food Shelf.  Our Summer Session class and volunteer families care for the garden all summer, watering and pulling weeds.  In the fall broccoli, carrots, potatoes, beets and zucchini  are harvested by our students and donated to the food shelf.  Planting and caring for our garden is one way we can give back to our community!  

      SUMMER SESSION
We say good-bye to our school year students in May but that leads us to the opening of our Summer Session.  We want to keep the learning going and the fun happening as long as possible!  Your 3-4-5 year olds can join us on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday mornings from 9:00-11:30, June 12 through July 19 for science, gardening, outdoor games, stories, music, a bike rodeo and much more.  During Salem’s VBS week we will join in some of the exciting activities planned for all the Bible School kids!  We don’t want to miss out on anything. ( We will not meet the week of the 4th of July.)  The cost of this program is $237 for five weeks of fun.  To register email Pam Carlson, pam@salemcovpreschool.com We would love to have you join us!
As you stroll through the church yard this summer make sure to check out our garden and perhaps snip a small bouquet of flowers to take home!